[Le Mélomane]

0479-0480

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[Le Mélomane]


Musical Maniac

A singing teacher, followed by his pupils, meet in the fields some telegraph wires strung on poles. These wires, the professor thinks, would form a very effective musical staff. He carries an enormous key of G which he throws upon the wires to give the proper pitch to his pupils. He forms a measure by fixing his cane in a perpendicular position among the wires which run in a parallel direction, thus forming the lines of a staff of music. In order to have notes, he tears off his own head and fixes it among the wires. Thus he obtained the first note of his air. Then he fixes upon this staff several heads corresponding in position to the first part of the tune, “God Save the King.” One hears the beating of drums, the heads rearrange themselves and one sees the second line of the air. Another beating of drums, and the heads shift about until they form the third line of music. Satisfied, the professor departs, followed by his pupils. The heads, abandoned among the wires, cast a look at the crowd as it disappears. Immediately they are changed to birds and fly away. This subject, accompanied by the proper music, produces great laughter.

LUB 1904-06


El drama

MEL 1904-A


The Melomaniac

Here we return to an astonishing subject most fantastically worked out. A singing teacher, followed by his pupils whom he has trained to manoeuvre with considerable skill, meets in the field some telegraph wires strung on poles. These wires, the professor thinks, would form a very effective musical staff. He carries an enormous key of G. which he throws upon the wires to give the proper pitch to his pupils. He forms a measure by fixing his cane in a perpendicular position among the wires, which run in a parallel direction, thus forming the lines of a staff of music. In order to have notes, he tears off his own head and fixes it among the wires. Thus he obtained the first note of his air. Then he fixes upon this bizarre staff several heads corresponding in position to the first part of the tune, “God Save the King.” One hears the beating of drums, the heads rearrange themselves, and one sees the second line of the air. Another beating of drums, and the heads shift about until they form the third line of music. Satisfied, the professor departs, followed by his pupils. The heads, abandoned among the wires, cast a look at the crowd as it disappears. Immediately they are changed to birds and fly away.
This subject, accompanied by the proper music, produces great laughter.

MEL 1905-A

2

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Méliès 479-480

 
2 Georges Méliès
3 1903 50m/170ft/131ft (LUB)
4 France
 

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07/02/1906 FranceParis G. Méliès Le Mélomane
 
G. Méliès
Paris, le 7 février 1906
Monsieur Caroli
[...]
479-480     Le Mélomane
Collection particulière [D.R.]

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